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in the near term to the u.s. economy? >> the sequester is not just a cut back, but a very crude cut back, sort of just chop one finger off at every hand instead of letting somebody go. i think it was designed that way because the idea was this will force us to do something. but now they haven't. >> i'm starting to hear people in washington say, look, this is going to force some efficiencies in these agencies. they've had budgets that have been getting bigger and bigger for years, stimulus thrown into all different kind of safety net fund funds. maybe this is just tough medicine. >> it might force efficiencies into some agencies, though they really weren't planning for it, so they're having to do it pretty hectically. some agencies you don't want to cut. across the board cuts are a very crude way to run policy. do you want to cut your research and development, medical care, projects where you promised to pay and may end up losing a lot of money? the problem is it's so crude. they said, okay, this won't happen. we all know we won't do this. >> we all agree there is no way to run a country. >> ye
the president's use of drones to kill al qaeda suspects, including, in some cases, u.s. citizens. our national investigative correspondent michael isikoff broke the story and has our report. >> reporter: drones have been called president obama's weapon of choice. during his four years as commander in chief, u.s. military and cia drone strikes have accelerated in an unprecedented pace. more than 400 cia strikes against targets in pakistan and yemen. eight times as many as under president bush. >> they have been very precise, precision strikes against al qaeda, and their affiliates. >> these strikes are legal. they are ethical. and they are wise. >> reporter: but today, new questions about drone strikes targeting american citizens, including anwar al awlaki. born in new mexico, and killed in yemen in 2011. he allegedly directed the so-called underwear bomber, who tried to blow up an airliner over detroit in 2009. but awlaki was never charged with a crime. nbc news has obtained this confidential 16-page justice department memo that concludes lethal strikes against u.s. citizens, who are operation
with its neighbors, peace negotiations and strengthening the u.s.-israeli strategic partnership. up next, the hacking into american computers. we're taking a deep dive into the security threat, who's being targeted and whether the u.s. government can do anything to stop it or whether they want to do anything to actively attempt to stop it. you're watching "the daily rundown" only on msnbc. [ male announcer ] if you can clear a crowd but not your nasal congestion, you may be muddling through allergies. try zyrtec-d®. powerful relief of nasal congestion and other allergy symptoms -- all in one pill. zyrtec-d®. at the pharmacy counter. and other allergy symptoms -- all in one pill. i've always kept my eye on her... but with so much health care noise, i didn't always watch out for myself. with unitedhealthcare, i get personalized information and rewards for addressing my health risks. but she's still going to give me a heart attack. that's health in numbers. unitedhealthcare. >>> it was this day in 1972 when president nixon began his trip to the people's republic of china, becoming the fir
of the world, europe, still very slow, but china a bit of a rebound, and, maria, the u.s. doing okay. again, hewlett-packard better than anticipated. >> all right, david, thank you. stay right there. we're going to bring in david garrity and roger kay of end point technologies associates. good to see everybody. thanks for joining us. want to point out aig numbers are also out, and i want to tell our viewers that there is stock to buy in aig after the close tonight. just spoke with the market-maker there, so we're watching that story as well as this story. hewlett-packard though is the focus right now. david garrity, what's your take on the quarter? >> the earnings multiple for the company, single digits, a five handle. i mean, here's a company. it's great and wonderful that they are doing better in terms of businesses that are losing share in the overall computing market, and it's thighs to see that they are getting some positive margin surprises, but the fact of the matter is hewlett-packard was initially thought to be an innovator and what we see out of corner, fine, we can rearrange the
from right here in the u.s.a. this man set up a trading company in philadelphia. you are charged with trying to buy a centrifuge that could be used to make biological weapons, like anthrax. >> yes. that's what they say. >> do you know how much money you have? >> no. >> i mean, does 17 billion sound about right? he is the richest man in russia who just bought the worst team in the nba. but as you'll see, he's not like any other owner of a big time american sports franchise. he's an adrenaline junkie with a few unusual toys. >> see? [gun clicking] >> and he owes some of his fame and fortune to a bevy of party girls. >> frankly speaking, i like women. >> coal has made jim rogers and his company rich, and that's why we were surprised to hear what this power baron has to say about what coal does to the environment. you know, there are a lot of people, many of them in your industry, many people that you probably know, who say that global warming is not a big problem. >> it's my judgment it is a problem. we need to go to work on it now. and it's critical that we start to act in this cou
toward the spending cuts, and if u.s. to further and that he's going to tell you that it's over ten years or 20 years that we would get 800 billion or some outrageous number. when you break that down 800 billion over ten or 20 years, were going to spend 800 billion in the next two weeks. melissa: and a lot of things, that like to put to the republicans and said they did this and that and they're not cutting spending. you know what, yes, just as guilty. is there any hope we will get this under control? of starting to feel a little despondent. >> the other part of a story from of a sequester, the white house made a big miscalculation here two years ago. they came up with this mechanism, they thought the republicans would never go along with these defense cuts. low and behold they say we can live with that and the president is saying we can't. here's why your question is an important one. i don't have too much faith in either party. 85 billion to what did they do? $60 billion. only 20 billion of that was even for the victims. the other 40 billion was pork. i'm with spencer. they ought to do
unveiled by two of the most liberal members of the u.s. senate. barbara boxer from california and bernie sanders from vermont want to make polluters to manufacturers, and power plant operators pay for the pollution they generate. joining me now with the top republican on the senate energy committee, senator lisa murkowski. thank you for being with us again. great to see you. the carbon tax, good or bad idea >> this is something that is going absolutely nowhere. if what is proposed is something that is going to increase the cost to the consumers, this is just not going to happen. and when you think about the proposal that has been before the cut across, the captain trade proposal, it does not even take out the democratic lead said. it did not want to touch that. and of the to going to want to touch a carbon tax either. this is something that is just going to increase the cost to the consumer at a time that nobody is looking to increase their energy costs. we should not be looking to increase it. we should be making our energy more affordable. gerri: let me give you some numbers here. the
have been under pressure. what we saw with u.s. airways, it was getting hit hard. warren buffett's company, berkshire hathaway, buying time out right here. they called it at 7250. >> yes, they just think it's a great product. he said he was absolutely going to be in for the long term. liz: it's not a classic equity deal where they shine it up. david: we just saw whole foods getting kicked today about 10%. >> that is not good news. david: as you can see, we have very big movements. do not be fooled when we see the dow jones down, the s&p 500 is up a little bit. less than a 10th of a percentage point, nasdaq, the biggest mover is the rest of 2000. it is the individual stocks, we have seen some big movements by individual stocks and we will be talking about coming up. liz: did you see the coal industry sector? lots of natural resources after the fourth-quarter earnings. all gaining more than 4%, 13 full percentage point. david: when you see that it is settling at the lowest level in six months, that is what gives people a lot of concern. it is just about at the 200 day moving averag
.75 a share. it would be the biggest leveraged buyout since the financial crisis. the u.s. government launching a civil lawsuit against standard & poors and mcgraw-hill over mortgage ratings. this is the first federal enforcement action against a credit rating agencies over alleged behavior tied more to the crisis. we'll talk more about the story and the implications with jacob frankel as 6:30 eastern. >>> and there's more news for boeing. the company has asked the faa for permission to do test flights. this suggests boeing has found solutions that led to the grounding of the entire fleet last month. the transportation agency says it's unclear whether battery, chemistry or an electrical issue caused a main battery on a plane owned by nippon airlines last month. investigators said today they may widen their probe on other components on the aircraft. >> thank you, mr. professor. yum brands is warning it is expecting 2013 warnings to shrink as it struggled to manage a food safety scare in china. remember i made that joke about cats. we'll leave that alone. also, toyota now raising its an
enforcement, even food inspection. and there are big worries about how it will hit the u.s. economy. >>> his side of the story. an emotional oscar pistorius in court for the first time. what he says really happened the night his girlfriend was killed. >>> and the brazen diamond heist at the airport right on the tarmac. a huge game of deception, $50 million worth of diamonds gone without a trace. "nightly news" begins now. >> announcer: from nbc news world headquarters in new york, this is "nbc nightly news with brian williams." >> good evening. it's an explosive allegation, and it's what we've all been warned about for years since the dawn of the computer age. a u.s. security firm says over 140 targets in this country have been hit electronically by a branch of the chinese military. big companies, you name it, some of the best-known brand names in the u.s. but more troubling than that is the idea that chinese hackers could reach into american society. the systems that run the country, our infrastructure and preserve order like power systems, air traffic, financial industry. it's a sweeping r
about drones is not that u.s. forces can kill people from the air using targeted so-called precision-guided missiles. u.s. forces have been killing people from the air for as long as we have had the capacity to put armed things in the air. what is novel about what our government is doing now in our day is not necessarily the technology. yes, we are using remote piloted aircraft versus traditionally piloted aircraft to launch these same missiles. but the type of aircraft, that is, the delivery system for the hellfire missile is not the new moral strategic legal thing that we are finding ourselves newly responsible for grappling with as citizens. it is not the technology by which u.s. forces are killing people which is knew in an important way. it's not the technology that's new. it is the circumstances. it is the circumstances of killing people away from where a war is being fought. if the u.s. was using a mix of helicopters and drones to fire hellfire missiles at insurgents who were fighting with u.s. troops in afghanistan right now, nobody would have a different ethical concern or a
is with the formerly with the u.s. department of labor. joining us tonight, former massachusetts senator scott brown and fox news contributor. welcome to all of you tonight. >> great to be with you. >> thank you. sandra: senator brown, i want to start with you first. this is your first time on the program so welcome. >> thank you. sandra: when we look at this new plan we say, well, everybody's got to give. everybody is going to be upset in some way. even erskin bowles, they're asking for the left to give even more here. i guess the big question, do you think this even has a fighting chance? >> well, first of all i think it is important to reference their involvement. that they're trying to re-engage congress, they're on hiatus. not only literally on hiatus with a vacation but they checked out when it comes to address the real issue. we need obviously to get our debt and did he sit under control as we all know. there is no effort to work in a truly bipartisan manner. the president has not reached out to the moderates on the republican side. i commend them for re-engaging. they're working with save th
. the u.s. government has been bringing this up with the chinese for a long time. it is low risk. it is low cost. it is high return and difficult to track. even getting a location on these servers, this is a little bit of guesswork involved there. there are real challenges there. the big question is, how do we respond? connell: if you had to give a great to the american public, how ready are we? >> there are so many elements. you have to peel back the onion. you have to talk about things like, you know, the electrical grid and things like that. i would say we are at a c level. guy forbid, it could come to conflict with the chinese could shut out the lights on us here. shut off the power. shut out though, you know, air traffic control system. connell: thank you. i also want to point out that the ceo of that company preparing the report will be on the next hour of "markets now" with dennis kneale and cheryl casone. dagen: already looking into some stock orders. what does the chief have to say about this? connell: washington's spending problem. entitlement programs like social secur
electric power on the u.s. east cost, maybe the west coast, and attempt to cause a cascading effect. all of those things are in the art of the possible from a sophisticated attacker. >> do you believe our adversaries have the capability of bringing down a power grid? >> i do. >> is the u.s. prepared for such an attack? >> no, the united states is not prepared for such an attack. >> it's now clear this cyber threat is one of the most serious economic and national security challenges we face as a nation. >> four months after taking office, president obama made those concerns part of our national defense policy, declaring the country's digital infrastructure a strategic asset, and confirming that cyber warfare had moved beyond theory. >> we know that cyber intruders have probed our electrical grid, and that in other countries cyber attacks have plunged entire cities into darkness. >> president obama didn't say which country had been plunged into darkness, but a half a dozen sources in the military, intelligence, and private security communities have told us the president was referring to br
on its nuclear program. they say the nuclear fuel is for energy reactors. the u.s. is concerned that they will produce weapons grade material. let's head to the pits of the cme and phil flynn. >> very little reaction down here. the very first place you want to look is the ti spread. it has spread out to the largest level of the year. it is possible that part of that could be this story. a lot of people did not hold out a lot of hope for the stocks. the direct talks with the u.s., they thought maybe something may come out of that. at least they were hopeful. the rejection, now that obviously looks like it will be off the table. these talks will not do a whole heck of a lot. this comes at a time where they are tightening sanctions even more on iran. we saw saudia arabia, and take if you cannot get enough supply, we will pump a little bit more. melissa: that u.s. productivity fell 2% in the fourth quarter to its lowest level in nearly two years. what does the next day to say about our economic recovery? what do you make of that productivity number? that jumped out at me. >> the mov
at the strong dollar. you also have to look that u.s. oil production did the highest level in almost 20 years. it is absolutely incredible. a couple days ago, everyone was talking about $100 a barrel. now they are wondering if $90 will hold. the april futures just hit $93, as i speak. inventories, of course, rose. it was on the increase in production. a decrease on imports. that really impacted the market. that is good news for gasoline prices. they got hit very hard. the gas inventories fell. that was a bigger drawdown in gasoline. because of the strong dollar, that is keeping that market very strong. heating oil, they do not seem to care. the other big numbers today, natural gas. a drawdown aided in expected. it gave natural gas a little bit of a boost today. we could see a bigger drawdown than expected next week. ashley: phil flynn of price future group. thank you so much. shibani: buckle up for more volatility, it sounds like. take a look at what is happening to the national price of gas. it is up there descent from a month ago. this is refinery plants across the country. they are facing
as we do every 15 minutes. lauren, we are starting the week on an up note. >> this u.s. stock market rally really started in europe. the u.s. market has of arrows across the board. a really tight range for stocks. volume clearly to the upside by about two-one your advance to the client line. really pushing closer to those all-time highs. 14,198. we are not far from there. 1576, we are not far from that either. we are getting there. hopefully, we can keep this winninn streak live. ashley: healthcare provider stocks taking a hit. proposing lowering medicare rates next year. peter barnes joins us now from inside the beltway with the details on this story. peter: they are proposing a cut of about 5% or so in payments to insurance companies that offer medicare advantage is. about a quarter of all seniors in medicare, about 15 million of them, are enrolled in medicare advantage. they could have added benefits. patients have to stay in their healthcare network which helps insurance companies, in theory, manage their costs. private insurers are reimbursed for all of this by the government. t
u.s. citizens. they're expected to zero in as his chief counter-terrorism adviser, specifically what he knew and when he knew it. his knowledge of the administration's use of the tactic faces scrutiny after the release of confidential government documents. drones are used to kill americans believed to be leaders of al qaeda. that news brought backlash from both sides of the aisle along with demands of the administration's legal justification for the strikes. the white house bound to growing political pressure and agreed to hand over the documents to congress. dianne feinstein who heads the intelligence committee says lawmakers should know what brennan knew and when he knew it. she released a statement saying it's critical for the committee's oversight function to fully understand the legal basis for all intelligence and counter-terrorism operations. >>> in a speech last summer, brennan said the use of drone strikes by the u.s. turned al qaeda into a shadow of what it once was. under president obama, the program has been used to take out more than 400 terrorist targets in pakistan and
the cia to track down osama bin laden. >> in the u.s., he's a hero for helping too lead our navy seals to the world's most wanted terrorist, but in pakistan, he's behind bars and considered or. who now wants to use the oscoor too bring attention to the plight of dr. afridi. >> a dramatic smash and grab. in the search to find the before they strike again. >> and the famous image capturing an iconic moment 60 years ago. raidsing the american plaghiro shima in the world war ii's most intense fighting. every day americans are caught in the middle of the budget. sweeping across the board cuts will begin in less than a reach. we heard dire warnings coming from lawmakerings, sequestitration would force longer lines and deep cuts to our military. in reality, the 85 billion in cuts makes up 2.4 percent of the federal budget and prompting republicans to use the white house to using scare tacticings. today lindsay addressing those in an interview on fox on huckabee tonight. here's the bit. >> the idea of republicans letting it go in affect and watching the fix it is not leadership. i thought we w
in the u.s., this guy wants to see it go up 22% from 20% but overall disney stocks near an all-time high, 54.50 is the all-time high. triple the s&p. liz: are you worried the upper income was 234 million versus 413 million? >> it is all about the releases and where you are in the schedule. they will look forward to what is coming up next. let's not forget they have iron man three coming out. i think wall street will look forward that way. and the cable networks seem to be doing pretty good. disney channel, espn. one of the best collections of entertainment media assets anywhere, has really been humming. david: that collection has grown tremendously. lucas films. have they paid too much? >> they bought marvel for a couple billion and turned into the avengers. i really think they have done a great job of absorbing these mergers. there's a conference call and i want to hear what are you doing with the film and what is your next plan? they just brought in jj abrams, he will be directing the next "star wars" coming out in 2015. the reason we are interested in disney so much is you can look at
as if it were an act of war. any attack against u.s. interests. now, it has become routine. we are getting a quarter of a million attacks against government facilities every day. we have a story like this today in which the federal reserve was hacked. presumably that a number of groups including anonymous. it should be very very disconcerting to all americans that we do not know who is caring out these attacks. we know, in general, that the people's republic of china carries out the largest number of attacks from mainland china against u.s. interests. mainland china and the peoples republic there. they managed to carry out, also 3500 front organizations in this country specifically to hack, acquire, steel, however you want to say it, military secrets. all of which have been the victims of cyber attacks. they say, well, nothing very much was, you know, taken from us. we do not know who did it. rest assured, it was a temporary problem and has since been fixed. it is repeated by the day. lori: do you think that these cyber attacks are escalating toward something bigger? to your point, you men
. goldman sachs chief u.s. economist out with a new report, saying that the economy will continue to go well below its potential. most consumers probably weren't aware of the hit to their disposable income until they receive their mid-january paycheck. one republican pollster in a new report rights that we have entered a new phase for the dysfunction and paralysis in washington is having a significant impact on how consumers feel about the overall state of the economy and their personal financial situation. the drop in consumer confidence, he says, is directly related to a lack of competence in our current political leaders. consumer confidence has taken a hit, a big one since post-world war ii history. already there is evidence of a slowdown in consumer spending. reports that wal-mart had its worst start to its month in seven years. the payroll tax hikes may be starting to bite. gas prices are up 51 cents in the last two months. prices are up every single day since the middle of january. it is already over $5 in parts of the country. there is a lot to talk about. the stock market hitting ne
spending cuts, cuts he fears will wreck the u.s. economic recovery. basically he wants lawmakers to kick the can down the road one more time. let's go to our white house correspondent dan lothian. dan is joining us. dan, the president made a little bit of a surprise appearance over in the white house briefing room. >> reporter: that's right. very surprising because the president in the past has criticized these short-term deals saying that this is not what the american people sent their elected officials to washington to do. you have this march 1st deadline quickly approaching. while congress is trying to work on a bigger budget, 1 pine point $2 trillion package, the president says they need more time in order to continue tipping away at the problem. the big concern is that everyone believes that the economy is moving in the right direction. the president is pointing to auto sales, the housing, to manufacturing. and so there's this worry that if this see quester happens, if these deep cuts happen then it could be a major set back for the u.s. economy. the president is saying the threat a
't giving up yet. i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." cutting our pay. that's how one u.s. officer says u.s. troops view the recommendation for a smaller pay increase in 2014. no one goes into the military to get rich but most servicemen and women need every dollar in their paycheck. so worried that next paycheck may be smaller is not going over well among the troops. our pentagon correspondent barbara starr has the details. she's working the story. barbara, what's going on? >> wolf, in this town, there's nothing that causes more anxiety in budget politics than the concept of cutting the pay for the troops. but that is exactly what is on the table if congress and the president cannot reach an agreement on a spending plan. the troops usually are happy to see defense secretary leon panetta, smiles and handshakes all around. but days before he leaves office, panetta has bad news. he's proposing less money in their paycheck next year. panetta, a savvy washington operative in budget politics, is leaving it to congress to figure out how not to cut pay and keep thousands of defen
by the u.s. postal service. manila. >> manila. >> smell like an envelope. go places. manila. manila. express mail your senses. hmm, paper. adhesive. manila by the u.s. postal service. the smell of mail. >> i think he is on to something. good day. i'm andrea mitchell live in washington. president obama and congressional republicans remain worlds apart on a realistic solution to prevent billions of dollars in automatic cuts. the sequester from kicking in march 1st. right now the politics are trumping any movement towards compromise. joining me now for our daily fix chris calizza, msnbc contributor and managing of post politics.com, and washington post reporters laurie montgomery and nia malika henderson. chris, first to you. set the stage for us. there's no solution in sight. is the white house expecting it has the high road in terms of politics of it and that republicans will be on the defensive because i don't see any way they're bridging the gap. there is no outward ed that began is being bridged. i think the government sees the only way it could be bridged by agreeing with some ta
to -- >> countdown starts right now. liz: good afternoon everybody. i'm liz claman. happy president's day. yes, the u.s. markets are closed, but we are open for business. and good thing at that, breaking news in just the last hour and a half, the "wall street journal" reporting that office max and office depot are in talks to merge. sources say the talks are fluid, could still fall apart, but an announcement could come as early as this week. office depot is the bigger of the two with a market value of about 1.3 billion dollars. while office max, about 933 million dollars. both have pretty much skyrocketed over the second half of last year. now, according to sources, the deal is expected to be stock for stock exchange. the possible merger could help the two office supply retailers team up against the 800 pound gorilla in the group, staples. would the deal get regulatory approval is a very important question because you may remember an attempt by staples and office depot to merge was blocked back in 1997 by the federal trade commission. but now growing competition with other chain stores and on-line reta
test on tuesday. iran turned to china in an effort to find parts to speed up its effort. a new u.s. report shows iran try to smuggle thousands of specialized maintenance through china. it banned from doing so under united nations sanctions. the track star accused of fatally shooting his girlfriend has been accused of murder. he shot his model girlfriend four times through a bathroom door at his home. he will remain in custody until a bail hearing on tuesday. those are your news headlines on the fox business network. back to connell. connell: manufacturing and a manufacturing renaissance. plant closings are still far more frequent than plant openings. jeff flock is in illinois today. jeff: the old harbor of coleman factory here and rockford, this was 65 acres. i just want to put some perspective on this for you. this is one that has been closed now for several years. i tell you, it is not coming back. if you look, they look more closely at the number of plant openings and plant closings. you see that at no time, in the past, well, no time in the past 30 years has the number of plant
will not furlough foreigners, though, who work on u.s. bases around the world. only american employees, why is that? >> reporter: well, that is right, wolf, places like japan, where the u.s. military has a significant presence, what they face is in some cases, it is the local government that pays the workers. so the furlough does no good. or they would have to open up the government to government agreement that governs these facilities. and that would take some time. so they just are not going to furlough the u.s. workers overseas. >> barbara star, how will the budget cuts be implemented if no deal is struck to head them off over the week. cnn's tom foreman has more. >> reporter: you know it is puzzling, wolf, because nobody in washington seems to know how it will really work. we're getting an idea, not just because there will be 10% cuts across the agencies that the impact will be felt by people. but more importantly, the way the cuts will probably be administered, probably, because we don't know how any given department will be able to handle it. let's talk about a department that doesn't exist,
vacations? go to gretawire.com and tell us what you think about it. coming up, allies or enemies? the u.s. considers pakistan a friend but has our government heard this one? 92% of pakistani disprove of u.s. leadership. by the way, who are the other 8%? also donald trump in the middle of a family feud. details coming up. for over 75 years people have saved money with...ohhh... ...with geico... ohhh...sorry! director's voice: here we go. from the top. and action for over 75 years people have saved money with gecko so.... director's voice: cut it! ...what...what did i say? gecko? i said gecko? aw... for over 75 year...(laughs. but still trying to keep it contained) director's voice: keep it together. i'm good. i'm good. for over 75...(uncontrollable laughter). what are you doing there? stop making me laugh. vo: geico. saving people money for over seventy-five years. gecko: don't look at me. don't look at me. [♪...] >> i've been training all year for the big race in chicago, but i can only afford one trip. and i just found out my best friend is getting married in l.a. there's no way i'm mi
through the laundry. criminal charges are a whole other kettle of fish. the u.s. attorney in los angeles investigated lance armstrong for almost two years and suddenly weirdly dropped everything without explaining anything a year ago, and reporters yesterday had a shot at asking whether the whole oprah interview and the admission i'm a druggy changed anything, when it comes to how the feds look at their set of facts. here's what he said. take a look. >> we made a decision on that case i believe it's a little over a year ago. obviously we have been well aware of the statements that have been made by mr. armstrong and other media reports. that's not changed my view at this time. we will continue to look at the situation. but it hasn't changed our view as i stand here today. >> it hasn't changed our view as i stand here today. jeffrey toobin, that's one u.s. attorney based in southern california, do all of the u.s. attorney's all over the country work in concert? or might one u.s. attorney say on another coast be working on a whole different investigation that he might not know about? >> th
are also on the $5 bill, the economic case for a penniless u.s. grows more compelling, giving ex-congre ex-congressman kolbe hope. >> when people find out about the savings they'll make it's substantial and they're willing to make this change. >> according to the congressman, not minting pennies would save the u.s. treasury about $45 million a year. and while we're on the subject, switch prg the paper dollar to a dollar coin would save $178 a year and a nickel now costs a dime to produce. quarter for your thoughts? thanks for watching "state of the union." i'm candy crowley in washington. head to cnn.com/sotu for analysis and extras. yo if you hissed any part of today's show, find us on itunes. search "state of the union." "fareed zakaria: gps" is next. >>> this is "gps," the global public square. welcome to all of you in the united states and around the world. i'm fareed zakaria. we have a great show for you today and we begin with american politics. what is really happening? are the republicans on the defensive? will the automatic budget cuts happen? is there any chance of legislative de
, just weeks after the last u.s. troops had left iraq for the last time. in the run-up to this year's state of the union address, just this weekend, the weekend before the first state of the union of president obama's second term, this is what happened in afghanistan. this is the change of command ceremony in afghanistan. general john allen handing over command of u.s. and international troops in afghanistan to a new commander, to commander joseph dunford. this is the 14th time that command has transferred in the afghanistan war, because that war has been going on for that long. general john allen is out as commander. he is handing over the leadership. if all goes as planned, general dunford is going to be the last person to have this job. he will be the 15th of 15 u.s. commanding generals for this war in afghanistan. as such, a substantial portion of what he'll be responsible for as commander will be leaving, the huge logistical feat of getting us after fighting there for 12 years. is that going to be a focal point of tomorrow's state of the union address? we do not know. we are no
the purse strings a little bit. nothing to write home about but in the u.s., for example, state and local governments grew for us and federal was not down year over year as we've seen in prior quarts. >> do you have any clarity on what this tells you in terms of the next couple of quarters on government spending? >> not in terms of government spending, maria. it does tell you if governments are going to deliver increased services to their customers they have to spend on i.t. most government leaders do the exact wrong thing. they basically try to hold on to all the employees and don't right size the organization and then use i.t. to provide better health care, education, security to their citizens. that usually takes a period of time, but for your state and local government, first resisted spinning i.t., perhaps ten months ago and it's picked up at a healthy growth rate of 7%. >> john, let me switch gears for a moment because you and many of your colleagues in business seem to be faced with this embarrassment of riches, and that is sitting on a lot of cash in terms of giving you great flex
for drones and the future of u.s. troops in afghanistan. >> i strongly believe 3,000 is too little. and 30,000 is too many. >> then our political panel on the state of the union watching and the new chairman of the senate foreign relations committee. plus, the high price of a penny. i'm candy crowley. and this is "state of the union." joining me from his home state of kentucky, senator rand paul. thanks for joining us this morning. you are going to deliver the tea party response to the president's state of the union. why is that needed? you have an "r" behind your name and so does marco rubio, who will deliver the republican response. >> i think it just shows that there is a movement within the republican party that's been very vocal. i think particularly in the 2010 elections there was a big movement that helped us win elections. a lot of energy that still comes from the tea party and while they consider themselves mostly to be republican, they will occasionally chastise the republican establishment. they want an independent voice. >> is that what you intend to do? to chastise the republi
did the cbo unearth? you will be as shocked as we were. >>> the u.s. has spent billions to keep egypt on our side. shouldn't wed be buying better friends? the fallout could reshape the middle east and we've got details. >>> the plot thickens for baseball's latest steroid scandal. it is not alex rodriguez link to a miami steroids clinic. more baseball stars are forced to speak out. what is the cost to their endorsements in the league? a former world series champion will give us his take. even when they say it's not it is always about money. melissa: all right, first tonight, the bombshell hidden within the congressional budget office's new report. the first shocker, flies in the face of president obama's claim. >> no matter what you've heard, if you like your doctor or health care plan, you can keep it. melissa: well, not really. the cbo always expected some people would get bumped off their plans. now it projects that number is actually double the august estimate of 4 million people. now, looking more like 7 to 8 million americans will lose their benefits trat work. here to help us so
. ashley: looking good, robert. melissa: the real housewives husband. ashley: thank you so much. melissa: u.s. home values closing out. 2012 medium home values are up 5.9% year over year. dan humphries -- stan humphries expects the recovery to continue. he is here with his predictions. thank you so much for coming on the show. let's start with the worst market for 2016. i want to drill down on some of these details. the places where you do not expect to see the biggest jump over the next year. they may be good opportunities for buyers, right? >> yes. some of the markets that will move slowest over the next year are markets in the midwest and northeast. think cincinnati, cleveland, new york, outside the five boroughs. out in new jersey, the markets are definitely moving slower. melissa: the reason why we highlight those, we call them the worst price appreciation over the next year, but they create good opportunities. talk about some of the best price appreciation targets right now. >> the best price appreciation that we expect to see is coming in markets that were the hardest hit during the do
food chains, particularly u.s. fast food chains because it is perceived they have higher quality food than local brands. so when that higher quality food that that reputation goes away, it's going to be very hard to win the consumers back. >> if you're buying the stock, which i'm ng, you're betting on novak. novak's a survivor. novak is a fellow -- he had a very similar address that i did at one point the. he lived in his car. this guy is a comeback kid. he can't come back in the -- >> the one thing i will say is the head of yum in china, sam su, is regarded as the godfather of fast food in china. he is the one who really made yum its presence, bigger than mcdonald's on the ground in china. born and raised in china, went to school here in the united states. maybe he has sort of a better sense of how to get back into the chinese market. it's going to be a big challenge. >> he's kitchen sinking, i think. one of the things that is the devil yum for the last 15 points, is that they can't get their arms around how bad it is. >> yeah. >> it's real bad. now they're saying it's real bad. mayb
in at this critical moment. the u.s. and much of the west convinced that iran continues to work toward those nuclear weapons. iran, of course, denying this and, as you point out, we are just days away now from the u.s. and iran joining a small group of others as they return to the negotiating table. we landed in iran, in a country where american journalists are rarely allowed to visit. and rarer still, we were given access to the people, the streets of tehran. above ground, a bustling city of 12 million. below ground, we discover a gleaming subway system, far quieter and cleaner than the famous subways of new york city. and there was something else very different. this says "women only" right here. the back of the train, reserved for women. but beyond the trains, the traffic, everywhere you look, there is something else on the move here. the prices. skyrocketing inflation. their currency losing 80% of its value in just the last year. u.s.-led sanctions tying an economic noose around iran. it's being felt by this young woman and her mother. >> day to day, increasing prices. >> reporter: you see it da
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